Pennsylvania’s Patient Test Result Information Act, which is set to take effect December 23, 2018, requires diagnostic imaging services providers that identify a “significant abnormality” in their test results to directly notify the patient or his/her designee within 20 days of the completed test, its review and its delivery to the ordering health care practitioner. 

USA Today, New York Times, BNA, and several other news outlets have been reporting over the last few weeks about non-competition agreements and non-compete laws especially related to low-wage workers.  There have been interesting changes and proposed changes to state laws that may affect several industries including healthcare.

In a recent article on Law360, titled

The Medicare incentive programs with which you and your medical practice are familiar will soon be no more.  As of January 1, 2017, these programs (including the Electronic Health Records (EHR) Meaningful Use Incentive Program, the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), and the Physician Value-Based Modifier Program) will morph into the new Medicare Quality Payment

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) issued an alert on November 28, 2016, regarding an email purporting to be from OCR.  This phishing email can look like an official government email which may use fake HHS letterhead and may even appear to be signed by OCR’s Director,

The Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) of the Department of Health and Human Services, generally, would have concerns about a potential or existing referral source receiving free goods or services, since these free goods and services could be used to provide unlawful payments for the referral of Federal health care program business.  However, under Advisory

As a follow up to our most recent post on What You Need to Know About PA’s Child Protective Services Law, you should know that the Pennsylvania Superior Court (PA’s primary appellate court) recently held that a physician may be sued for malpractice for failing to report suspected child abuse, even though there is not

As of December 1, 2015, the PA Medical Society has retracted its opinion that physicians, health care practitioners and practice staff must obtain child abuse clearances under the PA Child Protective Services Law.  The PA Department of Human Services has also informally agreed that such practitioners and staff are not required to obtain clearances.  Please

You may have heard some years ago that the Affordable Care Act established a “60-day overpayment rule” that requires a provider to report and return any overpayment from a federal health care program (such as Medicare or Medicaid) within 60 days of “the date on which the overpayment was identified” by the provider (for certain