New Jersey Legislation

Close up of health insurance formThe New Jersey Out-of-Network Consumer Protection, Transparency, Cost Containment and Accountability Act takes effect today, August 30, 2018, and requires all licensed health care professionals in New Jersey (including physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants, among others) who bill health benefits plans issued or delivered in New Jersey to provide certain disclosures to patients enrolled in such Plans.

The Act also contains additional obligations for physicians, including with respect to billing certain out-of-network services.  For more information regarding the Act’s impact on health care professionals and their employers, please see our Fox Rothschild Health Law Alert.

Beginning April 1, 2017, the regulations regarding opiate prescribing will be changing.  A Delaware healthcare practitioner will only be able to prescribe initial opioid prescriptions for acute pain episodes for up to seven (7) days for adult patients, and are required to follow new rules for chronic pain patients and patients that require more opioid medications for their acute pain episode.  The new regulations do have exemptions for hospice care patients, active cancer treatment patients, and terminally ill/palliative care patients.  These requirements and more details about the Delaware regulation are provided below.

New Jersey

On February 15, 2017, New Jersey’s Governor Christie signed into law legislation that limits initial opioid medications to five (5) day supplies, which is one of the most stringent in the country.  The limit would not apply to end of life care, cancer, and chronic pain patients.  The new law also includes a requirement that prescribers take continuing education that includes issues concerning prescription opioid drugs. The law goes into effect May 16, 2017.  It is likely that new regulations are pending to address these changes and we will provide more information at that time.

Delaware Acute Pain Episode Opioid Treatment Requirements

If a healthcare practitioner, based on their professional medical judgment, wishes to prescribe an adult more than a seven-day supply in an initial encounter or subsequent encounter, the practitioner must: (1) document the issue requiring a greater quantity in patient’s medical record; (2) “query the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PMP) to obtain a prescription history”; (3) “indicate that a non-opioid alternative was not available”; (4) obtain Informed Consent consistent with the regulation; (5) “conduct a physical examination, which must include a documented discussion of elicit relevant history, explain risks and benefits of opioid analgesics and possible alternatives, other treatments tried or considered and whether opioid analgesics are contra-indicated”; (6) “schedule/undertake periodic follow-up visits and evaluations to monitor progress toward goals in a treatment plan, whether there is an available alternative to continue opioid use, and whether to refer the patient for a pain management or substance abuse consultation”; and (7) at the discretion of the practitioner, administer a fluid drug screen.

Delaware Chronic Long-Term Opioid Treatment Requirements

For chronic long-term treatment with an opioid, a healthcare practitioner must follow the guidelines listed above as well as:

(1) query the PMP at least every six months or more frequently if clinically indicated (including, when a patient is on a benzodiazepine, the patient is potentially at risk for substance abuse or misuse, or when the patient demonstrates such things as loss of prescriptions, requests for early prescriptions or similar behavior); (2) administer a fluid drug screen at least every six months; and (3) obtain a signed Treatment Agreement containing the elements in the regulation.

Delaware Opioid Treatment for Minors

For minors, healthcare practitioners cannot prescribe opioid analgesics for more than a seven-day supply at any time, and must discuss with the parent or guardian the risks associated with the use and the reason for use of the medication.

For more information on Delaware’s new changes please see the following documents on Delaware’s Controlled Substance Advisory Committee’s website Delaware Prescription Opioid Guidelines for Health Care Providers and the Uniform Controlled Substances Act Regulations.