On Fox’s In the Weeds blog, associate Richard Holzworth discussed the influx of patients registering for the Pennsylvania Medical Marijuana Program, and provided an overview of key policy and procedure updates that PA’s healthcare facilities, including hospitals and long-term care providers, should adopt:

Illustration of Rod of Asclepius on marijuana leafDespite Pennsylvania’s medical marijuana industry being in its infancy, more than 17,000 patients have registered for the program, and more than 4,000 already have received their medical marijuana card from the Department of Health. Now that cannabis products have burst onto the scene, hospitals and other residential healthcare facilities are struggling with what to do when patients present medical marijuana cards and attempt to use marijuana in the facilities. Indeed, it is high time for the healthcare providers to update their policies and procedures to address these growing concerns.

Policy Considerations

In developing a medical marijuana policy, it is important for healthcare administrators to remember that medical marijuana, although legal in most states, is still classified by the federal government as a Schedule I Controlled Substance. With medical marijuana laws varying from state to state, hospitals, healthcare associations, and other stakeholders have developed and implemented a wide range of policies addressing the use and possession of medical marijuana products. These policies range from strict, categorical prohibitions to sanctioned self-therapy during hospital admission. Regardless of a healthcare facility’s philosophy (either from a political or medicinal perspective) on medical marijuana, it is important for each institution to develop and implement a comprehensive set of policies and procedures to address the inevitable circumstance of a patient presenting with a medical marijuana ID card or cannabis products in hand.

Due to the large volume of patient registrants to the Commonwealth’s medical marijuana program, PA physicians and their staff may see local healthcare facilities make changes to their policies and procedures with respect to medical marijuana in the coming months.

We invite you to read Richard’s full informative piece and stay tuned for our coverage of further developments.

Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of the Department of Human Services, recently announced during a press conference that HHS will as of July 1, 2011 be rolling out a $77 million computer program designed to prospectively identify potentially fraudulent Medicare claims by collecting and analyzing patterns in large numbers of submitted claims. According to a recent article in the Philadelphia Inquirer, the technology to be used by HHS is known as “predictive-modeling” software and is similar to technology used by banking and telecommunications companies in the private sector to identify fraud. The price tag for the new system will be paid through funding under The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. In the same press conference, Attorney General Eric Holder announced that in the last two years alone, the Federal Government has collected nearly $8 billion in judgments, settlements, fines, restitution and forfeitures related to healthcare fraud and improper Medicare payments.

It is apparent that the federal government is in fact putting its money where its mouth is when it comes to fraud and abuse enforcement. Physicians and other healthcare providers who have put their internal compliance efforts on the backburner in the last several years are well advised to redouble their compliance efforts – particularly with regard to periodic coding, documentation and claims review – to identify patterns and deficiencies which may raise red flags for the government and other third party payer programs. Auditing should be targeted, focusing on problem or high risk areas specific to practice specialty or service area. In addition, to be effective, auditing should be conducted at least annually and should be done under the supervision of legal counsel to preserve attorney client privilege of audit results. An experienced health care attorney can also help providers design audits and counsel on how to rectify identified deficiencies. Of course, deficiencies should be corrected (which may include refunding monies to Medicare or the third party payer programs) and providers and billing personnel should be appropriately educated based on audit findings. For more information on designing an effective compliance program, providers can visit the OIG’s website.

A recent whistleblower case out of the federal 3rd Circuit in Pennsylvania highlights some of the dangers in not properly documenting financial relationships between physicians and hospitals. Specifically, in US ex. rel. Kosenske v. Carlisle HMA, Inc., a Qui Tam lawsuit brought by the former member of an anesthesia group, the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a US District Court’s summary judgment in favor of the defendant hospital and anesthesia group.

The anesthesia group in question had a written exclusive contract with the hospital for anesthesia services but, subsequent to entering into the exclusive agreement, began providing pain management services at the hospital’s freestanding pain center. The hospital did not charge the anesthesia group rent for use of the space in the pain center and the qui tam relator claimed that the arrangements failed to meet the Stark exception for personal service arrangements (and therefore that claims for services referred by the anesthesia group’s physicians to the hospital were in violation of the federal False Claim Act).


Continue Reading Pennsylvania Qui Tam Case Highlights Dangers in Physician/Hospital Arrangements