Last month, Apple issued a long awaited announcement of their move into the medical records field, by debuting new functions in the updated Health app for the iOS 11.3 beta, allowing users to view and aggregate their medical records on their iPhones.

The new “Health Records” features within the Health app brings together hospitals, clinics and the existing Health app to make it easy for consumers to see their available medical data from multiple providers whenever they choose. Now, consumers will have medical information from various institutions organized into one view covering allergies, conditions, immunizations, lab results, medications, procedures and vitals, and will receive notifications when their data is updated. The Health Records data is encrypted and protected with the user’s iPhone passcode.

To launch the beta version that features the new “Health Records” section, Apple partnered with 12 major health systems[1] and leading EHR vendors Cerner and Epic, using Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) to facilitate the transfer of medical records. In the coming months, more medical facilities will connect to Health Records offering their patients access to this feature.

The goal is for consumers to have their medical information from various institutions organized into one view covering allergies, conditions, immunizations, lab results, medications, procedures and vitals. It all works when a user opens the iPhone’s health app, navigates to the Health Record section, and, on the new tool, adds a health provider. From there, the user is connected to Apple’s software system to obtain their records and even incorporate new data. Patients will also receive notifications when new information is added to their record.

Regulators and patient advocates have for years pushed for data-sharing standards within the medical sector to make it easier for records to flow between hospitals and doctors’ offices. The lack of interoperability has led to inefficiencies in care and frustrations from both providers and consumers. This move by Apple could effectively pressure EHR vendors to open up access to patients’ digital records and truly force EHR vendors to provide access to their data through open application programming interfaces (API) as mandated by the 21st Century Cures Act.

 

[1] The following participating hospitals and clinics are among the first to make this beta feature available to their patients:

  1. Johns Hopkins Medicine – Baltimore, Maryland
  2. Cedars-Sinai – Los Angeles, California
  3. Penn Medicine – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  4. Geisinger Health System – Danville, Pennsylvania
  5. UC San Diego Health – San Diego, California
  6. UNC Health Care – Chapel Hill, North Carolina
  7. Rush University Medical Center – Chicago, Illinois
  8. Dignity Health – Arizona, California and Nevada
  9. Ochsner Health System – Jefferson Parish, Louisiana
  10. MedStar Health – Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia
  11. OhioHealth – Columbus, Ohio
  12. Cerner Healthe Clinic – Kansas City, Missouri

[For more information on CMS’s new Quality Payment Program and what physicians need to report in 2017, please see our prior blog posts here and here.]

CMS recently issued guidance (accessible here) on the three-part “Prevention of Information Blocking” attestation which physicians and other eligible clinicians will need to submit to CMS in order to qualify for points under the “Advancing Care Information” category of the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).

Although making this attestation and reporting to CMS regarding use of certified EHR technology (CEHRT) is not required to avoid a penalty under the MIPS for 2017, many physicians and group practices wish to report as much as they reasonably can to seek a high score under the MIPS and a positive payment adjustment to their Medicare reimbursements in 2019.

The three-part attestation centers on the representation that the physician/group practice will not knowingly and willfully limit or restrict the compatibility or interoperability of its CEHRT.  CMS’s guidance makes clear that physicians and group practices making the attestation must use good faith and reasonable efforts to enable the exchange of electronic health records between appropriate parties.

According to CMS, examples of situations where access to CEHRT could be reasonably restricted include:

  1. System Maintenance — Disabling CEHRT for as long as reasonably necessary to complete system maintenance, provided that requests for access to EHR information during such time period are responded to when practical;
  2. Security Concerns — Blocking access to CEHRT when reasonably necessary to ensure the security of EHR information, provided that the blocking was narrowly tailored to the bona fide threat; and
  3. Patient’s Health and Well-Being — Restricting access to certain information (such as a patient’s sensitive test results), if the clinician reasonably believes that the restriction is necessary to protect the patient’s health or well-being. In the case of sensitive test results, CMS suggests that restricting access to the results could be reasonable until the physician or clinician who ordered the test has reviewed and appropriately communicated the results to the patient.

CMS expects that physicians and group practices making the attestation will ensure that their organizational policies and workflows will not restrict functionality of the CEHRT in any way, and that they will work with their CEHRT vendors to ensure that the CEHRT is fully functional.

If you or your practice will be reporting EHR data to CMS under the MIPS for 2017, a full review of CMS’s guidance on the attestation is recommended (see the five-page guidance here).  All physicians and practices reporting EHR data under the MIPS have until March 31, 2018 to report the data and make the attestation.

The Medicare incentive programs with which you and your medical practice are familiar will soon be no more.  As of January 1, 2017, these programs (including the Electronic Health Records (EHR) Meaningful Use Incentive Program, the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), and the Physician Value-Based Modifier Program) will morph into the new Medicare Quality Payment Program (QPP).   The QPP will also include a fourth category of incentives entitled “Clinical Practice Improvement Activities”, which we discuss in more detail below.

The purpose of the QPP is to create one central program that will govern Medicare Part B payments to physicians, while incentivizing physicians to increase quality of care and decrease inefficiencies in the cost of care for Medicare patients.  Participation in the QPP will be mandatory beginning January 1, 2017.  The QPP will either reward or penalize physicians and their practices by adjusting their reimbursement rates under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule two (2) years after the reporting year.  Therefore, physicians/practices will have their reimbursement rates adjusted in 2019 based on their reporting data for the year 2017.

As we noted in our first blog post in the Series, accessible here, physicians will have the option to choose between two payment tracks under the QPP:  (1) the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS); and (2) an Advanced Alternative Payment Model (Advanced APM).  This blog post will discuss the basics of the MIPS and how to qualify for the MIPS in 2017, while our next post will touch on the basics of participation in Advanced APMs.

Basics of the MIPS

Each physician or group practice (you may report individually or as a group) participating in the MIPS in 2017 will earn a “composite performance score” based on the physician/group’s scores within the following four (4) categories:

  1. Quality of Care – 60%
    • Explanation: Scored based on the reporting of “quality measures”, which will be published annually by CMS.  Physicians will be able to choose which quality measures they will report each year.
    • Replaces: PQRS and quality component of the Value-Based Modifier.
  2. Advancing Care Information – 25%
    • Explanation: Scored based on the reporting of EHR use-related measures with which you are familiar from the current EHR Meaningful Use Incentive Program.  However, unlike the existing program, the QPP measures will not have “all-or-nothing” targets.
    • Replaces: EHR Meaningful Use Program.
  3. Clinical Practice Improvement Activities – 15%
    • Explanation: Scored based on attestation by the physician/group that the physician/group has performed certain care coordination, beneficiary engagement, population management and patient safety activities.
    • Replaces:   New Program.
  4. Resource Use – 0%
    • Explanation: Scored based on per capita patient costs and episode-based measures.  CMS collects and analyzes the data from your claims submissions.  No additional reporting will be required.
    • Replaces: Cost component of the Value-Based Modifier.

How to Qualify for 2017

CMS has eased the reporting requirements for the first year of the QPP.  No physician/group will be required to begin collecting data in accordance with the QPP’s requirements on January 1, 2017 (but may elect to do so).  To receive a neutral or positive payment adjustment, physicians/groups will need to report data for only a 90-day performance period during the year.  There are also minimum threshold reporting requirements to avoid a negative payment adjustment and full participation requirements which are more likely to result in a guaranteed positive adjustment.  The table below organizes the requirements in an easy-to-read format:

MIPS Measures Chart

Final Thoughts on Qualifying for the MIPS in 2017

  • Get involved sooner rather than later. CMS has kept reporting requirements minimal in 2017 in order to encourage clinicians to participate in the QPP.  Take advantage of that opportunity to ensure your practice has the right software to report the quality and EHR use-related measures.  Since adjustments will be made based on threshold scores, it may be easier in 2017 to earn a positive adjustment, and even an exceptional bonus, than in later years.
  • Ensure that your current EHR technology meets the requirements for the QPP in 2017, including reporting capabilities for quality measures and EHR use-related measures. The easiest way to do this is to contact your EHR vendor.
  • CMS has given providers plenty of time to report 2017 data. The deadline for reporting 2017 data is March 31, 2018.

As always, if you have questions specific to your practice, please contact a knowledgeable and experienced attorney.

There are big changes coming to the Medicare incentive programs as we know them.  Beginning on January 1, 2017, the new Quality Payment Program (the “Program”) will replace all existing Medicare incentive programs with a comprehensive incentive model.  The Program will involve a modified set of EHR Meaningful Use requirements, new quality of care metrics, new cost efficiency goals and “clinical practice improvement activities” (for which physicians will be rewarded for care coordination, beneficiary engagement and patient safety).  The Program will also have a separate track for incentive payments associated with participation in Advanced Alternative Payment Models (such as Accountable Care Organizations) (“APMs“).

Congress provided for the development of the Program in the 2015 Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (the “MACRA”).  Under the MACRA, the Program must be “budget-neutral” each year.  In other words, the rewards paid by Medicare to well-performing physicians and practices must be equally offset by the penalties levied against poor-performing providers.  The rewards will continue to take the form of payment adjustments to the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule.  The first year of payment adjustments will be 2019, based on data from the 2017 reporting year.  For 2019, the reward paid to (or penalty levied against) any provider may not exceed a 4% adjustment to the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule.  However, in subsequent years, the limits are set to increase, reaching a maximum of 9% in 2022.

The potential for substantial penalties under the Program has led to concerns that the Program will make it difficult for smaller practices with higher numbers of Medicare patients to be financially viable.  Foreseeing these economic issues, Congress earmarked $100 million over five years to help small practices successfully participate in the Program.

In June, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) announced that the first $20 million of these earmarked funds will be awarded by the end of 2016.  The recipients of the funding will be organizations that provide education, training and consultation on the Program to small practices.  In particular, these organizations will assist small practices in understanding what quality measures, EHR options and clinical practice improvement activities are most appropriate for their practices.  The organizations will also help small practices evaluate their options for joining an APM.  HHS has not announced when the organizations will begin training and educating small practices.

While the intention behind such training and education is laudable, it does not lay to rest the concern that small practices serving substantial Medicare populations will be under greater pressure and financial strain to continue to operate independently.  After all, the Program itself must remain budget-neutral.  If practices improve their compliance and quality of care metrics, payment adjustments will have to be reduced or compliance standards raised.  In the long-term, this may lead to small practices being forced to join an APM in order to continue to serve Medicare patients.

Stay tuned for updates on the Program from CMS, including details on the final regulations for the Program.  If you have specific questions about how the Program may affect your practice, be sure to contact a knowledgeable healthcare attorney.

The deadline for providers to file a hardship exception application to the electronic health record (EHR) meaningful use requirements for the 2015 reporting period is July 1, 2016.

If you have any concern that your practice or certain eligible professionals in your practice may have been unable to meet the meaningful use requirements for the 2015 reporting period, it may be appropriate for the applicable provider to file a hardship exception application with CMS to avoid future payment adjustments.  Note also that certain provider types may automatically qualify for a hardship exception for the 2015 reporting period without the need to file an application.

For more information, please see the Health Law Practice Alert recently published by Fox Rothschild LLP on this topic, accessible at this link:  Fox Rothschild LLP Health Law Practice Alert – Hardship Exception (June 17, 2016).

If you intend to take advantage of the Medicare EHR Incentive Program in the first year of participation, you will need to attest that you have met the “meaningful use” requirements for 90 consecutive days.  If your initial attestation fails, you can select a different 90-day reporting period that may partially overlap with a previously reported 90-day period. To attest for the Medicare EHR Incentive Program in subsequent years, you will need to meet meaningful use for a full year.

Importantly, meaningful use attestation must be done through CMS’ web-based attestation and registration system found at the following link: https://ehrincentives.cms.gov/hitech/login.action. Physicians will qualify for a Medicare EHR incentive payment upon completing a successful online submission through the system.  More information the registration process can be found at CMS’ registration page here: http://www.cms.gov/EHRIncentivePrograms/20_RegistrationandAttestation.asp

Physicians must register for Medicaid HER incentives through a similar state system. More information on the Medicaid registration process can be found here: http://www.cms.gov/apps/files/medicaid-HIT-sites/