Last month, CMS Administrator Seema Verma announced several initiatives to innovate the delivery of patient care at the ground level.  In collaboration with the Trump Administration and other federal agencies, CMS is taking steps to implement a system in which patients have control of their electronic health information and can easily transfer it between health care providers.  This system, referred to as “MyHealthEData,” is also intended to allow both physician and patient to access the clinical and payment data required to make the best healthcare decisions at the point of care.

Doctor using tablet to view electronic medical recordAs announced, CMS’s short-term efforts in connection with the MyHealthEData initiative include:

  • Launching Medicare’s Blue Button 2.0, which will allow a patient to access and share his/her healthcare information and medical history with a new physician, leading to less duplication in testing and enabling continuity of care.
  • Requiring providers to update their systems to improve data sharing.
  • Requiring hospitals to share specific types of data with a patient’s receiving facility or post-acute care provider following discharge.
  • Streamlining documentation and billing requirements for E&M codes to allow doctors to spend more time with their patients.
  • Reducing the incidence of unnecessary and duplicative testing that occurs as a result of providers not sharing data.

CMS is also taking steps to overhaul the EHR incentive programs (including the Advancing Care Information category of the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and the EHR Incentive Programs for Hospitals) to prioritize interoperability of EHR systems, reduce the time and costs required to comply, and prevent providers from withholding healthcare data from patients.

For more information on the MIPS and the Quality Payment Program, please see our prior post here and CMS’s interactive website on the Quality Payment Program here.

For more information on the MyHealthEData Initiative, please see CMS’s published Fact Sheet.  Stay tuned to Fox Rothschild’s Physician Law Blog for updates.

[For more information on CMS’s new Quality Payment Program and what physicians need to report in 2017, please see our prior blog posts here and here.]

CMS recently issued guidance (accessible here) on the three-part “Prevention of Information Blocking” attestation which physicians and other eligible clinicians will need to submit to CMS in order to qualify for points under the “Advancing Care Information” category of the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).

Although making this attestation and reporting to CMS regarding use of certified EHR technology (CEHRT) is not required to avoid a penalty under the MIPS for 2017, many physicians and group practices wish to report as much as they reasonably can to seek a high score under the MIPS and a positive payment adjustment to their Medicare reimbursements in 2019.

The three-part attestation centers on the representation that the physician/group practice will not knowingly and willfully limit or restrict the compatibility or interoperability of its CEHRT.  CMS’s guidance makes clear that physicians and group practices making the attestation must use good faith and reasonable efforts to enable the exchange of electronic health records between appropriate parties.

According to CMS, examples of situations where access to CEHRT could be reasonably restricted include:

  1. System Maintenance — Disabling CEHRT for as long as reasonably necessary to complete system maintenance, provided that requests for access to EHR information during such time period are responded to when practical;
  2. Security Concerns — Blocking access to CEHRT when reasonably necessary to ensure the security of EHR information, provided that the blocking was narrowly tailored to the bona fide threat; and
  3. Patient’s Health and Well-Being — Restricting access to certain information (such as a patient’s sensitive test results), if the clinician reasonably believes that the restriction is necessary to protect the patient’s health or well-being. In the case of sensitive test results, CMS suggests that restricting access to the results could be reasonable until the physician or clinician who ordered the test has reviewed and appropriately communicated the results to the patient.

CMS expects that physicians and group practices making the attestation will ensure that their organizational policies and workflows will not restrict functionality of the CEHRT in any way, and that they will work with their CEHRT vendors to ensure that the CEHRT is fully functional.

If you or your practice will be reporting EHR data to CMS under the MIPS for 2017, a full review of CMS’s guidance on the attestation is recommended (see the five-page guidance here).  All physicians and practices reporting EHR data under the MIPS have until March 31, 2018 to report the data and make the attestation.

Under CMS’s new Quality Payment Program, which will adjust Medicare Part B payments starting in 2019 based on data from this year, physicians and other eligible clinicians must qualify for one of two payment “tracks”, either the Merit-Based Incentive System (MIPS) or the Advanced Alternative Payment Model (Advanced APM) track.   A physician who qualifies under the MIPS in 2017 can earn up to a 4% payment adjustment to Medicare Part B payments in 2019.  Physicians who qualify under the Advanced APM track can earn up to a 5% payment adjustment in 2019.  For more information on the Quality Payment Program and the MIPS, please see our prior blog post on the topic here.

Since the Quality Payment Program went into effect on January 1, 2017, it has been unclear whether physicians participating in an Advanced APM in 2017 would be able to meet CMS’ quality and reporting requirements and earn a 5% payment adjustment to their Medicare Part B claims in 2019.

CMS recently provided clarity on this issue by predicting that almost 100% of physicians and other eligible clinicians participating in Advanced APMs in 2017 will qualify for a 5% payment adjustment to their Medicare Part B claims in 2019.  CMS based this prediction on an analysis of Advanced APM claims data submitted from January through August 2016 (before the Quality Payment Program went into effect).

CMS also stated that physicians who participate in an Advanced APM need to meet only one of two criteria to earn the 5% payment adjustment in 2019:  (1) receive 25% of the physician’s Medicare Part B payments through the Advanced APM; or (2) see 20% of the physician’s Medicare patients through the Advanced APM.  [A list of Advanced APMs in which a physician may participate in 2017 can be found at the following link: CMS List of Advanced APMs]

Participating in an Advanced APM can have several benefits (including being exempt from reporting quality data under the MIPS payment track), but also involves taking on some risk.  If you are considering participation in an Advanced APM, please contact an experienced attorney to discuss.

CMS is expected to issue formal determinations regarding the qualification of particular physicians for the Advanced APM track later this year.  Stay tuned to Fox Rothschild’s Physician Law Blog for updates.

The deadline for providers to file a hardship exception application to the electronic health record (EHR) meaningful use requirements for the 2015 reporting period is July 1, 2016.

If you have any concern that your practice or certain eligible professionals in your practice may have been unable to meet the meaningful use requirements for the 2015 reporting period, it may be appropriate for the applicable provider to file a hardship exception application with CMS to avoid future payment adjustments.  Note also that certain provider types may automatically qualify for a hardship exception for the 2015 reporting period without the need to file an application.

For more information, please see the Health Law Practice Alert recently published by Fox Rothschild LLP on this topic, accessible at this link:  Fox Rothschild LLP Health Law Practice Alert – Hardship Exception (June 17, 2016).