The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires Medicare providers to return overpayments within 60 days of the date they are identified in order to avoid liability under the False Claims Act.  Four years ago, CMS issued a proposed rule to implement this statutory requirement that would have placed a substantial burden on providers to identify and

Commercial payors are actively looking for ways to reduce payments to out-of-network providers.  One area of focus is discounts and waivers of patient copayments and deductibles by out-of-network providers.  In the eyes of these payors, coinsurance/copayments are essential to incentivizing patients to use in-network providers, and discounts on (or waivers of) coinsurance/copayments by out-of-network providers

A new study in the BMJ suggests that the more services a physician provides to his or her patients, the less likely the physician is to be sued for malpractice.  The study examined the use of resources by attending physicians in several Florida acute care hospitals during a ten-year period from 2000-2009, in relation to

You may have heard some years ago that the Affordable Care Act established a “60-day overpayment rule” that requires a provider to report and return any overpayment from a federal health care program (such as Medicare or Medicaid) within 60 days of “the date on which the overpayment was identified” by the provider (for certain

You may have heard that CMS recently expanded its authority to deny enrollment and revoke the Medicare billing privileges of providers and suppliers.  The new changes could affect any physician, group practice or other Medicare provider or supplier.  As the changes are wide reaching, all Medicare providers and suppliers, and anyone providing support services for

As of today’s date, Congress has not yet fixed or even patched the expected 21% cut to the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule.  A eNews alert sent out today by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services notifies physicians of the following:

The negative update of 21% under current law for the Medicare Physician Fee

These days, more often than not, physicians and up on the short end of the stick when it comes to new health care legislation. However, last month a bill was introduced by Senator David Argall which, if passed, would give physicians and other healthcare providers important protection against retroactive insurance denials. Specifically, Senate Bill No.

In response to the development of alternative payment systems, provider networks are forming at a frenetic pace. If you are like most of my physician clients, you have been or will shortly be presented with network participation agreements for review (or in many cases, signature with very little opportunity to review) and consideration. In evaluating

Many physicians pay very little attention to their managed care participation agreements.  In fact, some simply sign these agreements without ever reading them.  I think this apathy stems from the fact that managed care plans generally refuse, at least for smaller practices, to “negotiate” their fee schedules.  But, even if a payor won’t negotiate fees,