Billing & Reimbursement

[For more information on CMS’s new Quality Payment Program and what physicians need to report in 2017, please see our prior blog posts here and here.]

CMS recently issued guidance (accessible here) on the three-part “Prevention of Information Blocking” attestation which physicians and other eligible clinicians will need to submit to CMS in order to qualify for points under the “Advancing Care Information” category of the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).

Although making this attestation and reporting to CMS regarding use of certified EHR technology (CEHRT) is not required to avoid a penalty under the MIPS for 2017, many physicians and group practices wish to report as much as they reasonably can to seek a high score under the MIPS and a positive payment adjustment to their Medicare reimbursements in 2019.

The three-part attestation centers on the representation that the physician/group practice will not knowingly and willfully limit or restrict the compatibility or interoperability of its CEHRT.  CMS’s guidance makes clear that physicians and group practices making the attestation must use good faith and reasonable efforts to enable the exchange of electronic health records between appropriate parties.

According to CMS, examples of situations where access to CEHRT could be reasonably restricted include:

  1. System Maintenance — Disabling CEHRT for as long as reasonably necessary to complete system maintenance, provided that requests for access to EHR information during such time period are responded to when practical;
  2. Security Concerns — Blocking access to CEHRT when reasonably necessary to ensure the security of EHR information, provided that the blocking was narrowly tailored to the bona fide threat; and
  3. Patient’s Health and Well-Being — Restricting access to certain information (such as a patient’s sensitive test results), if the clinician reasonably believes that the restriction is necessary to protect the patient’s health or well-being. In the case of sensitive test results, CMS suggests that restricting access to the results could be reasonable until the physician or clinician who ordered the test has reviewed and appropriately communicated the results to the patient.

CMS expects that physicians and group practices making the attestation will ensure that their organizational policies and workflows will not restrict functionality of the CEHRT in any way, and that they will work with their CEHRT vendors to ensure that the CEHRT is fully functional.

If you or your practice will be reporting EHR data to CMS under the MIPS for 2017, a full review of CMS’s guidance on the attestation is recommended (see the five-page guidance here).  All physicians and practices reporting EHR data under the MIPS have until March 31, 2018 to report the data and make the attestation.

Under CMS’s new Quality Payment Program, which will adjust Medicare Part B payments starting in 2019 based on data from this year, physicians and other eligible clinicians must qualify for one of two payment “tracks”, either the Merit-Based Incentive System (MIPS) or the Advanced Alternative Payment Model (Advanced APM) track.   A physician who qualifies under the MIPS in 2017 can earn up to a 4% payment adjustment to Medicare Part B payments in 2019.  Physicians who qualify under the Advanced APM track can earn up to a 5% payment adjustment in 2019.  For more information on the Quality Payment Program and the MIPS, please see our prior blog post on the topic here.

Since the Quality Payment Program went into effect on January 1, 2017, it has been unclear whether physicians participating in an Advanced APM in 2017 would be able to meet CMS’ quality and reporting requirements and earn a 5% payment adjustment to their Medicare Part B claims in 2019.

CMS recently provided clarity on this issue by predicting that almost 100% of physicians and other eligible clinicians participating in Advanced APMs in 2017 will qualify for a 5% payment adjustment to their Medicare Part B claims in 2019.  CMS based this prediction on an analysis of Advanced APM claims data submitted from January through August 2016 (before the Quality Payment Program went into effect).

CMS also stated that physicians who participate in an Advanced APM need to meet only one of two criteria to earn the 5% payment adjustment in 2019:  (1) receive 25% of the physician’s Medicare Part B payments through the Advanced APM; or (2) see 20% of the physician’s Medicare patients through the Advanced APM.  [A list of Advanced APMs in which a physician may participate in 2017 can be found at the following link: CMS List of Advanced APMs]

Participating in an Advanced APM can have several benefits (including being exempt from reporting quality data under the MIPS payment track), but also involves taking on some risk.  If you are considering participation in an Advanced APM, please contact an experienced attorney to discuss.

CMS is expected to issue formal determinations regarding the qualification of particular physicians for the Advanced APM track later this year.  Stay tuned to Fox Rothschild’s Physician Law Blog for updates.

The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 requires Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) to remove Social Security Numbers (“SSNs”) from all Medicare cards. Physicians currently use a SSN-based Health Insurance Claim Number (“HICN”) for Medicare transactions like billing, eligibility status, and claim status. Starting April 1, 2018, CMS will begin mailing new cards with a randomly assigned Medicare Beneficiary Identifier (“MBI”) to replace the existing HICN. All Medicare cards will be replaced by April 1, 2019, affecting approximately 57.7 million beneficiaries.

The initiative is intended to better protect private health care and financial information; however, many physicians are unclear as to their responsibilities to ensure that billing privileges aren’t affected.  Although CMS has designated the time period running from April 1, 2018 through December 31, 2019 as a transition period, during which physicians may use either the HICN or MBI in Medicare transactions, physician systems must be able to accept the new MBI format by April 1, 2018, which is the beginning of the transition period.

Earlier this month, CMS released a five-point bulletin on steps physicians can take to prepare for the change. CMS advises physicians to do the following:

  • Go to CMS’ provider website and sign up for the weekly MLN Connects newsletter;
  • Attend CMS’ quarterly calls to get more information;
  • Verify all Medicare patients’ addresses. If the addresses on file are different than the Medicare addresses on electronic eligibility transactions, ask patients to contact Social Security and update their Medicare records;
  • Work with CMS to help patients adjust to their new Medicare cards. When available later this fall, display helpful information about the new Medicare cards; and
  • Test system changes and work with billing office staff to be sure the office is ready to use the new MBI format.

Earlier this month, a New York man was sentenced to 10 years in prison for allegedly operating a $26 million scheme to defraud Medicare and Medicaid. The defendant allegedly established 6 medical clinics in Brooklyn that paid elderly people to pose as patients and billed Medicare and Medicaid for unnecessary and/or non-existent medical care and equipment. The defendant, who was not a doctor, operated the six clinics between 2007 and 2013, but because New York’s corporate practice of medicine doctrine requires that such clinics be owned and operated by licensed healthcare professionals, he found three physicians to serve as nominal clinic owners. The allegations included that the physicians would periodically come to the clinic to sign medical charts for patients who they never treated, and for others, prescribe unnecessary medications, procedures and supplies. The clinics allegedly incentivized elderly patients to seek “treatment” at the clinics through cash kickbacks.

In addition to his prison term, the defendant was ordered to pay $16,686,811 in forfeiture and a restitution order of $18,683,691. Although this was an extreme “billing mill” case, the severity of sentencing highlights the importance of billing compliance obligations. Also, since New York law strictly prohibits unlicensed individuals, such as the defendant, from owning medical clinics and/or influencing medical decision making, clinics should ensure that such functions are exclusively reserved to its licensed healthcare providers. The corporate practice of medicine doctrine varies from state to state, so we recommend that you contact a knowledgeable and experienced healthcare attorney in your state if you have any questions regarding these requirements.

As many people are discussing methods to improve healthcare, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is giving stakeholders an opportunity to send in their thoughts on this topic.  In CMS’s April 14, 2017 proposed rule, CMS issued a “Request for Information” (“RFI”), where they described their desire to have a “national conversation” about improving the health care delivery system.

CMS would like to know, amongst other ideas: (1) How CMS can help make its healthcare delivery system (Medicare) less bureaucratic and complex; and (2) How CMS can reduce the burden on clinicians, providers and patients in a manner that increases quality of care and decreases costs.  “CMS is soliciting ideas for regulatory, sub-regulatory, policy, practice and procedural changes to better accomplish these goals.”

Per CMS, some ideas could include recommendations regarding payment system re-designs; elimination or streamlining of reporting; monitoring and documentation requirements; and operational flexibility; amongst others.  CMS is also looking for ideas on how CMS issues regulations and policies, and how these could be simplified.

In a separate RFI in the same proposed rule, CMS also seeks information on how the scope and restrictions imposed on “Physician-Owned Hospitals” affect the delivery system, particularly with regards to Medicare beneficiaries.

To the extent respondents have data and specific examples, CMS requests such information be included in the submission.  If a proposal involves novel legal questions, CMS is also welcoming analysis regarding CMS’ authority.

If you wish to submit your comments to CMS, you have until June 13, 2017 to do so.

For more information please see the CMS Fact Sheet for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 Medicare Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) and Long Term Acute Care Hospital (LTCH) Prospective Payment System Proposed Rule, and Request for Information CMS-1677-P.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) recently introduced a new education initiative for Chronic Care Management (“CCM”) patients and providers. The initiative, called Connected Care, is intended to raise awareness of the benefits of providing CCM services to Medicare beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions and to help ensure that health care providers are receiving optimal reimbursement for providing such services.

CMS has stated that two-thirds of Medicare beneficiaries have two or more chronic conditions, and one-third have four or more chronic conditions. CMS recognizes CCM as a critical component to primary care that contributes to better quality health care at reduced cost. However, many CCM providers are not aware that the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule allows separate payments for CCM services such as telephone communication, review of medical records and test results, and coordination and exchange of health information with other providers. CCM also includes activities such as patient education or motivational counseling, which are provided either in person or by telephone. Physicians, certified nurse midwives, clinical nurse specialists, nurse practitioners and physician assistants may bill for CCM services.

Specifically, CPT Code 99490 has been available since 2015 for eligible providers to bill for at least 20 minutes of clinical staff time directed by a physician each month to coordinate care for beneficiaries who have two or more serious chronic conditions expected to last at least 12 months. Effective January 1, 2017, CMS expanded the CCM billing codes to account for more complex and time-consuming care coordination:

  • HCPCS Code G0506 is an add-on code to the CCM initiating visit for providing a comprehensive assessment and care planning to patients;
  • CPT Code 99487 is for complex CCM that requires substantial revision of a care plan, moderate or high complexity medical decision making, and 60 minutes of clinical staff time;
  • CPT Code 99489 is a complex CCM add-on code for each additional 30 minutes of clinical staff time.

CMS’ Connected Care program provides the following educational materials for CCM services:

If you have questions regarding billing for CCM services, please contact a knowledgeable and experienced healthcare attorney.

We recently issued a Health Law Alert on the Medicare Quality Payment Program, focusing specifically on what physicians and their medical practices need to know to be in compliance with the Program in 2017.  The Alert may be accessed at this link: Fox Rothschild Health Law Alert – Medicare Quality Payment Program

You may also view some of our recent posts on the Physician Law Blog for more information on the Medicare Quality Payment Program.  In short, compliance with the Program in 2017 can earn you and your practice anywhere from a 0%-4% increase in your reimbursements under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule in 2019.  However, failure to meet at least the minimum level of compliance this year will result in a negative adjustment of 4% to your Medicare reimbursements in 2019.

Stay tuned to Fox Rothschild’s Physician Law Blog for updates on the Medicare Quality Payment Program in 2017 and beyond.

The Medicare incentive programs with which you and your medical practice are familiar will soon be no more.  As of January 1, 2017, these programs (including the Electronic Health Records (EHR) Meaningful Use Incentive Program, the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), and the Physician Value-Based Modifier Program) will morph into the new Medicare Quality Payment Program (QPP).   The QPP will also include a fourth category of incentives entitled “Clinical Practice Improvement Activities”, which we discuss in more detail below.

The purpose of the QPP is to create one central program that will govern Medicare Part B payments to physicians, while incentivizing physicians to increase quality of care and decrease inefficiencies in the cost of care for Medicare patients.  Participation in the QPP will be mandatory beginning January 1, 2017.  The QPP will either reward or penalize physicians and their practices by adjusting their reimbursement rates under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule two (2) years after the reporting year.  Therefore, physicians/practices will have their reimbursement rates adjusted in 2019 based on their reporting data for the year 2017.

As we noted in our first blog post in the Series, accessible here, physicians will have the option to choose between two payment tracks under the QPP:  (1) the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS); and (2) an Advanced Alternative Payment Model (Advanced APM).  This blog post will discuss the basics of the MIPS and how to qualify for the MIPS in 2017, while our next post will touch on the basics of participation in Advanced APMs.

Basics of the MIPS

Each physician or group practice (you may report individually or as a group) participating in the MIPS in 2017 will earn a “composite performance score” based on the physician/group’s scores within the following four (4) categories:

  1. Quality of Care – 60%
    • Explanation: Scored based on the reporting of “quality measures”, which will be published annually by CMS.  Physicians will be able to choose which quality measures they will report each year.
    • Replaces: PQRS and quality component of the Value-Based Modifier.
  2. Advancing Care Information – 25%
    • Explanation: Scored based on the reporting of EHR use-related measures with which you are familiar from the current EHR Meaningful Use Incentive Program.  However, unlike the existing program, the QPP measures will not have “all-or-nothing” targets.
    • Replaces: EHR Meaningful Use Program.
  3. Clinical Practice Improvement Activities – 15%
    • Explanation: Scored based on attestation by the physician/group that the physician/group has performed certain care coordination, beneficiary engagement, population management and patient safety activities.
    • Replaces:   New Program.
  4. Resource Use – 0%
    • Explanation: Scored based on per capita patient costs and episode-based measures.  CMS collects and analyzes the data from your claims submissions.  No additional reporting will be required.
    • Replaces: Cost component of the Value-Based Modifier.

How to Qualify for 2017

CMS has eased the reporting requirements for the first year of the QPP.  No physician/group will be required to begin collecting data in accordance with the QPP’s requirements on January 1, 2017 (but may elect to do so).  To receive a neutral or positive payment adjustment, physicians/groups will need to report data for only a 90-day performance period during the year.  There are also minimum threshold reporting requirements to avoid a negative payment adjustment and full participation requirements which are more likely to result in a guaranteed positive adjustment.  The table below organizes the requirements in an easy-to-read format:

MIPS Measures Chart

Final Thoughts on Qualifying for the MIPS in 2017

  • Get involved sooner rather than later. CMS has kept reporting requirements minimal in 2017 in order to encourage clinicians to participate in the QPP.  Take advantage of that opportunity to ensure your practice has the right software to report the quality and EHR use-related measures.  Since adjustments will be made based on threshold scores, it may be easier in 2017 to earn a positive adjustment, and even an exceptional bonus, than in later years.
  • Ensure that your current EHR technology meets the requirements for the QPP in 2017, including reporting capabilities for quality measures and EHR use-related measures. The easiest way to do this is to contact your EHR vendor.
  • CMS has given providers plenty of time to report 2017 data. The deadline for reporting 2017 data is March 31, 2018.

As always, if you have questions specific to your practice, please contact a knowledgeable and experienced attorney.

You may have heard that a transformation of Medicare’s physician payment program is in the works.  However, you may not know that the structure of the new program, called the “Quality Payment Program”, has been finalized and will begin its first reporting year on January 1, 2017.  Now is the time for you and your practice to get up to speed on the new Quality Payment Program.  This post is the first in a new Blog Series that we will be publishing on Fox Rothschild’s Physician Law Blog to help you and your practice prepare for Medicare’s Quality Payment Program.

In October, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a Final Rule setting forth the structure of the Quality Payment Program and the parameters for its first year of operation.  The purpose of the Quality Payment Program is to create one central program that will govern Medicare Part B payments to physicians, while incentivizing physicians to increase quality of care and decrease inefficiencies in the cost of care for Medicare patients.  The Quality Payment Program will consolidate the existing Medicare incentive programs (which include the Electronic Health Records (EHR) Meaningful Use Incentive Program, the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS), and the Physician Value-Based Modifier Program), along with a new program incentivizing clinical improvement activities, into a single payment program that will either reward or penalize physicians by adjusting their reimbursement rates under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule.

In each reporting year under the Program, physicians will be required to qualify for one of two (2) payment tracks:  (1) the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS); or (2) the Advanced Alternate Payment Model (Advanced APM) model.  The MIPS is the default payment track, and will be the track used by most physicians over the next five years.  Qualification for the Advanced APM model requires participation in a CMS-approved Advanced APM.  The long-term goal of CMS is for most physicians and practices to participate in Advanced APMs.

While calendar year 2017 will be the first reporting year under the Quality Payment Program, payment adjustments for physician performance in 2017 will not be made until the 2019 calendar year.  This two-year gap between reporting and payment adjustment has been carried over from the existing incentive programs and may eventually be shortened.  However, for now, the gap will allow a smoother transition from Medicare existing incentive programs, which have collected data over the last two years for incentive payments in 2017 and 2018, respectively.  To be clear, incentive payments based on data reported under existing incentive programs in 2015 and 2016 will still be made.

The good news is that CMS has eased the reporting requirements for the first year of the Program.  For example, no physician will be required to begin collecting data in accordance with the Program’s requirements on January 1, 2017.  To receive a neutral or positive adjustment to reimbursements in 2019, physicians will need to report data and perform certain practice activities for a 90-day performance period during the year.

Stay tuned to the Physician Law Blog for upcoming posts on what you and your practice need to know about the Quality Payment Program (QPP).  The next posts in the QPP Blog Series will be:

  1. Basics of the MIPS and How to Qualify in 2017
  2. Basics of Advanced APMs and How to Qualify in 2017
  3. Details of the MIPS Scoring System

In the interim, if you would like to learn more about the QPP, we encourage you to check out the excellent website CMS has developed on the QPP, which can be found at this link:  https://qpp.cms.gov

As always, if you have questions regarding the applicability of the QPP to you and your practice, we advise you to consult with a knowledgeable attorney.

There are big changes coming to the Medicare incentive programs as we know them.  Beginning on January 1, 2017, the new Quality Payment Program (the “Program”) will replace all existing Medicare incentive programs with a comprehensive incentive model.  The Program will involve a modified set of EHR Meaningful Use requirements, new quality of care metrics, new cost efficiency goals and “clinical practice improvement activities” (for which physicians will be rewarded for care coordination, beneficiary engagement and patient safety).  The Program will also have a separate track for incentive payments associated with participation in Advanced Alternative Payment Models (such as Accountable Care Organizations) (“APMs“).

Congress provided for the development of the Program in the 2015 Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (the “MACRA”).  Under the MACRA, the Program must be “budget-neutral” each year.  In other words, the rewards paid by Medicare to well-performing physicians and practices must be equally offset by the penalties levied against poor-performing providers.  The rewards will continue to take the form of payment adjustments to the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule.  The first year of payment adjustments will be 2019, based on data from the 2017 reporting year.  For 2019, the reward paid to (or penalty levied against) any provider may not exceed a 4% adjustment to the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule.  However, in subsequent years, the limits are set to increase, reaching a maximum of 9% in 2022.

The potential for substantial penalties under the Program has led to concerns that the Program will make it difficult for smaller practices with higher numbers of Medicare patients to be financially viable.  Foreseeing these economic issues, Congress earmarked $100 million over five years to help small practices successfully participate in the Program.

In June, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) announced that the first $20 million of these earmarked funds will be awarded by the end of 2016.  The recipients of the funding will be organizations that provide education, training and consultation on the Program to small practices.  In particular, these organizations will assist small practices in understanding what quality measures, EHR options and clinical practice improvement activities are most appropriate for their practices.  The organizations will also help small practices evaluate their options for joining an APM.  HHS has not announced when the organizations will begin training and educating small practices.

While the intention behind such training and education is laudable, it does not lay to rest the concern that small practices serving substantial Medicare populations will be under greater pressure and financial strain to continue to operate independently.  After all, the Program itself must remain budget-neutral.  If practices improve their compliance and quality of care metrics, payment adjustments will have to be reduced or compliance standards raised.  In the long-term, this may lead to small practices being forced to join an APM in order to continue to serve Medicare patients.

Stay tuned for updates on the Program from CMS, including details on the final regulations for the Program.  If you have specific questions about how the Program may affect your practice, be sure to contact a knowledgeable healthcare attorney.