Billing & Reimbursement

The New Jersey Out-of-Network Consumer Protection, Transparency, Cost Containment and Accountability Act (the “Law”), New Jersey’s “surprise” medical billing law, went into effect on August 30, 2018.  Among other things, it requires licensed health care professionals in New Jersey (including, but not limited to, physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners) that bill health benefits plans

On October 24, 2018, Congress enacted a new anti-kickback law that applies to many commercial health insurance plans, as well as Medicare and Medicaid.  The law, known as the “Eliminating Kickbacks in Recovery Act of 2018” (the “Law”), was passed as part of the SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act, which generally targets the national

Close up of health insurance formThe New Jersey Out-of-Network Consumer Protection, Transparency, Cost Containment and Accountability Act takes effect today, August 30, 2018, and requires all licensed health care professionals in New Jersey (including physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants, among others) who bill health benefits plans issued or delivered in New Jersey to provide certain disclosures to patients

CMS recently issued its proposed changes to the 2019 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule, which include a controversial change to the reimbursement rates for Level 2-5 evaluation and management (E/M) services and some notable changes to the Quality Payment Program.  This post highlights some key aspects of the Proposed Rule that will affect medical practices.

Red stethoscope with a pile of hundred dollar bills.CMS

This is the second installment in a new series on the Physician Law Blog entitled “Small Doses” designed to provide you with quick updates on meaningful issues.  We will continue to provide you with detailed updates on significant topics which we think are worth your time to read.  The purpose of “Small Doses” is to

The transportation landscape in America has evolved and these developments are now impacting health care. With about 75 percent of the U.S. population living in a county with access to an on-demand ride-hailing service, many patients are turning to ride-share services, like Uber and Lyft, as a means to obtain their medical care.

The idea

Last month, CMS Administrator Seema Verma announced several initiatives to innovate the delivery of patient care at the ground level.  In collaboration with the Trump Administration and other federal agencies, CMS is taking steps to implement a system in which patients have control of their electronic health information and can easily transfer it between health

[For more information on CMS’s new Quality Payment Program and what physicians need to report in 2017, please see our prior blog posts here and here.]

CMS recently issued guidance (accessible here) on the three-part “Prevention of Information Blocking” attestation which physicians and other eligible clinicians will need to submit to CMS in

Under CMS’s new Quality Payment Program, which will adjust Medicare Part B payments starting in 2019 based on data from this year, physicians and other eligible clinicians must qualify for one of two payment “tracks”, either the Merit-Based Incentive System (MIPS) or the Advanced Alternative Payment Model (Advanced APM) track.   A physician who qualifies under

The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 requires Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) to remove Social Security Numbers (“SSNs”) from all Medicare cards. Physicians currently use a SSN-based Health Insurance Claim Number (“HICN”) for Medicare transactions like billing, eligibility status, and claim status. Starting April 1, 2018, CMS will begin mailing